Wii U to Support Free-To-Play

Thursday, June 14th, 2012

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In Nintendo’s E3 2012 Analyst Q&A session, numerous questions were asked about the Wii U.  The questions ranged from what the initial memory will be to friend codes to how they will implement what they learned with the 3DS in terms of pricing for the Wii U.  One of the main points in the interview dealt with the issue of free-to-play and micro-transactions.

From Satoru Iwata:

With respect to the Wii U system, when we began working on it, one of our goals was to have a variety of purchase options and additional e-commerce options available at its launch. And because of that, we have prepared a Digital Rights Management system. We have designed the system from a technical standpoint to allow developers to freely take advantage of things like free to play and micro transactions.

The Nintendo President also said that Nintendo could (and may) make properties that could use the free-to-play model.  However, he states the current lineup Nintendo has does not necessarily work well for that model.  In addition, Iwata states that Nintendo may wait some time before attempting first party games that use a free-to-play model.

More from the interview, including thoughts about SmartGlass, exchange rates, and market schemes, can be found here.

Additional Source

About Jeff Neuenschwander

Jeff has been a supporter of the website and campaign since the beginning. Joining in for E3 2012, he worked his way up the ranks quickly, making it to the Editing Manager post at the beginning of 2013. Jeff has a wide variety of tastes when it comes to gaming and pretty much likes anything that is quirky, although his favorite genres are Action, Platforming, and RPG. Outside of gaming, Jeff is a musician, being trained as a trombonist for Jazz and Classical music, and holds a degree in Sound Recording.




  • A DRM system? Now I’m very afraid. Most DRM has not been very consumer friendly and really only punishes people who buy a game legitimately.