REVIEW: Hatsune Miku: Project Diva – Future Tone

Monday, January 9th, 2017

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Title Hatsune Miku: Project Diva – Future Tone
Developer SEGA
Publisher SEGA
Release Date January 10th, 2016
Genre Rhythm
Platform PlayStation 4
Age Rating Teen
Official Website

Being a big fan of the Hatsune Miku: Project Diva series, I was pretty stoked when SEGA announced they were bringing Hatsune Miku: Project Diva Future Tone to the West. This compilation of over 200 tracks from the Project Diva Arcade series is what fans have been wanting for many years. The question, is how did the localized version of this compilation turn out? Let’s find out!

For those not in the know let’s explain a little bit about how this compilation is being sold. There are two different song packs; Colorful Tone, which are the cute and more upbeats songs, and the Future Sound Packs, which are more rock and dance style songs. Each of these content packs contain over 100 songs and retail for $29.99 each. Personally I would recommend getting the bundle with both packs included for $53.99. This not only gives you access to all 224 tracks but also the ability to mix and match hair styles between costumes and play a hidden survival mode.

Project Diva Future Tone | Survival

Just like with other entries in the franchise, there have been some gameplay tweaks made to this version. First off the Star Notes or Scratch Notes are gone. I was really pleased to see this as I feel they were added just to use the Vita’s touch features and made the game more difficult for the wrong reasons. They have been replaced with slide notes, which look like a broken line with an arrow on the end, and they will either point left or right. To hit these all you have to do is tilt the analog stick that corresponds with that direction or you can use the L and R triggers on top of the controller. You will hold this direction or button until the end of these notes. Another big change is Arrow Notes no longer require you to press that direction on the D-Pad and a face button at the same time. They are only the D-Pad direction now and are completely independent of the Face Button Notes. This is done because now there are 3 or 4 button and d-pad combination notes that will appear in songs. This happens very frequently on hard, extreme and Ex-extreme and can be quite tricky to master at first. The game does provide a very useful practice option for getting these sections down, and the tight controls help this along nicely as well.

Project Diva Future Tone | Costumes

Graphically this game is arcade perfection. This is as close as you are ever going to get without importing a Project Diva Arcade machine from Japan. The game runs at a solid 60 FPS and never lags or slows down. The diva models all look amazing and are very detailed. I’ve seen those models for years and I noticed small details such as writing I could never read before when playing this. Some of the costumes featured are from other SEGA titles such as Valkyria Chronicles, Sonic, and even Resonance of Fate. The environments look equally as stunning and I really loved all the different lighting effects.

Project Diva Future Tone | Cheer

As you can imagine the soundtrack here is absolutely amazing. These 200 plus tracks cover most of the songs to ever appear in the Project Diva Arcade and a lot of these have made their way onto home console games. You’ve likely heard at least some of these tracks before if you’ve played one of the previous games. No matter your taste in music there is something for you here. There are slow songs, fast upbeat songs, and everything in between. Certain tracks will allow you to switch which vocaloid is singing the song, so this can mix things up a bit for tracks where it is available. There are several different sound effects that play when you hit a note during gameplay. Each track a has default sound effect, but you can also customize each one to your liking as well.

Project Diva Future Tone | Miku Godzilla

It is hard for me not recommend Hatsune Miku: Project Diva Future Tone. The huge tracklist containing lots of fan favorites, amazing graphics, arcade perfect gameplay, tons of costumes and even a playlist editor if you just want to chill watching your favorite tracks make this an amazing package. I spent well over 40 hours with this one and I completed just over half the tracks. If you’re a Project Diva fan this is a must own title, or if you are a fan of rhythm games in general you would be hard pressed to find a better title out there.

Review Score
Overallwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com

Game was provided by the publisher for review purposes.

About Steve Baltimore

Steve started with oprainfall not long after the campaign moved from the IGN forums to Facebook. Ever since, he has been fighting to give all non-mainstream RPGs a fair voice. As the site admin, he will continue to do this and even show there is value in what some would deem "pure ecchi." He loves niche games and anime more than anything... well, except maybe Neptune.




  • Shadowstrike

    Good to see a perfect score the game does everything right and has such a huge track list it only makes sense for the genre to finally get a perfect game.

  • Landale

    The D-Pad thing isn’t quite right here. That there’s no more Up+Triangle is right but they’re not independent of each other, or at least not as far as I’ve seen yet, but rather it’s a style choice to reinforce that the D-Pad and the shapes are one and the same. Up, Left, O, X is even how the tutorial teaches you the buttons while still letting you know that Triangle, Square, Right and Down work just as well.
    Honestly, I would have preferred that they kept the old setup there, as the multi-press stuff is far more needless difficulty than the paired presses or even the stars ever were due to the indicators being scattered all over the place.
    The Slides are definitely an improvement over the Stars though, even if I do get tripped up occasionally during fast or flashy bits on “Is that Left Slide or Left/Square?”
    Aside from them rather horribly failing to grasp the concept of “Don’t fix what isn’t broken” by going from paired press to multi-press, I think my only other real complaints about this one are that certain songs are difficulty locked. Only Hard and Extreme have everything. 149/224 Easy and 216/224 Normal, and it’s not even as if they keep adding more as you go up since Easy has access to some that Normal does not
    That and the difficulty going up a rank at parts in East/Normal songs to Normal/Hard, sure those points also make it so you can’t automatically fail, but that’s honestly just adding insult to injury by just dragging shit out as you’re not likely to get a sufficient score on the song to have it considered cleared if you’re fucking up there anyway. Another case of “Don’t fix what isn’t broken” failed miserably at, as the old technical zones punish you for failing at your chosen difficulty while challenge time punishes you for failing at what is above your chosen difficulty.
    Those two points really make it feel like the game is just saying “Fuck you” to anyone not able to handle everything on Hard/Extreme.