RUMOR: Gal*Gun, Senran Kagura are Being Pulled From Stores Shelves in Australia

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

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Gal*Gun | What're ya buyin'?

Living in Australia definitely isn’t the best luck for anyone that enjoys Japanese games to have. Whether it’s the fact that games that are considered innocuous in other territories might be refused classification by their ratings board, or today’s news that retailers are pulling newly-released games from store shelves. Rice Digital – exclusive carrier for the title’s “Mr. Happiness Edition” – reported the that Gal*Gun: Double Peace was being pulled from EB Games stores in Australia. Reports are also coming in that newly released physical print runs of Senran Kagura: Estival Versus are finding themselves pulled as well.

Needless to say, this is definitely unconfirmed for now. That being said, although PQube Games – the title’s publisher in all territories – haven’t made an official announcement, their Head of Marketing, Geraint Evans, has retweeted the original Rice Digital article. Of special note is the fact that Geraint Evans is Rice Digital’s founder, in addition to his roles at PQube; if anyone knows what’s going on, it’s probably him. Regardless, let’s hope for some sort of official explanation for the rumor soon.

We’ve reached out to PQube for more details about today’s news. As more information comes in – such as whether or not it’s only EB Games pulling the titles, or if the games are being pulled nationwide – we’ll be sure to update you when we learn more. Since both the titles were EB Games exclusive in Australia, it should be interesting to learn what made them have a change of heart, if that was the case.

About James Galizio

I'm a writer for TechRaptor+Operation Rainfall; technology and games in particular have been my passion my whole life, and to contribute to the industry has been my dream. If I'm not writing or working on other work, you can almost always find me playing some sort of game! (or watching anime)




  • Dgnfly

    Can’t we make Australia the country of the SJW and Feminists then we can finally get rid of this kinda nonsense.

    • Kazkari

      That would be useful but I’d feel sorry for the Australians, I think censorship is pointless. I mean the game is abit creepy but its harmless fun, I’m even considering getting it myself. But really the point of my post is that these games aren’t getting censored due to feminists or even SJW’s because they only attack mainstream games. I’d just say some countries are prudish. Oh the other hand the Australians are lucky to even have thes physically in shops, I can only find this stuff online, I’d have more chance of winning the lottery than seeing any anime game in person.

    • DizzyGear

      Yeah but those countries are lumped with the rest of the PAL zone so the non shitty countries are affected by their bullshit.

      For example thanks to Germany’s bullshit the rest of the PAL zone has to suffer censored games as well because publishers often cant be arsed to make a special censored German edition and wont skip Germany either because that means too many lost sales they’ll just censor the game for entire goddamn region just because of one fucking country with a retarded Christian ruling party who blames the recent terrorist attacks on violent videogames instead of Islam.

    • Dgnfly

      Still they have the same kinda believes as SJW/Feminists cause tehy feel that nudity encourages rape and violence creats murder yet the biggest thing to happen in australia lately was religious extremism but nobody talking about banning islam and that is killing at a massive rate.

    • “But really the point of my post is that these games aren’t getting
      censored due to feminists or even SJW’s because they only attack
      mainstream games.”

      I don’t have any evidence that the game is getting pulled because of the SJWs/feminists.

      But yet YOU don’t have have any evidence that it isn’t because of SJWs/feminists either.

      All I’ll say is that Australia has become an extremely SJW-feminist idealogical country which operates heavily on leftist SJW ideals socially and politically.

      Make of that what you will.

      “I’d just say some countries are prudish”

      Which is exactly one of the hallmarks of SJW and feminist ideology…

    • j0eeyy_p

      Oh, I recommend giving Gal*Gun a try, especially if you find it cheap.

    • Nin

      Considering Britain already dumped their debtors there, I don’t see anything wrong with dumping all of the SJWs there.

      Provided we save the innocents there, of course.

    • Paychi

      Well it used to be an island to store criminals. Why not?

    • convince the manginas, white-knights and male feminists first

  • Mr0303

    Well that’s terrifyingly Orwellian, but at this point expected from Australia.

  • Kazkari

    I honestly feel really sorry for Australians, they usually have to import our over priced EU versions then they have to deal with customs and if not its this crap.

    • Probably cheaper than them buying it in Aus, though.

    • j0eeyy_p

      I see many Australian gamers importing the US versions of games. Significantly cheaper and often get limited editions too.

      If I ever moved to Australia that’s what I would do.

  • DizzyGear
  • Was talking to a guy on IRC:

    [16:44:14] Jigsy, jbhifi don’t sell galgun either
    [16:44:31] JB HiFi?
    [16:44:41] another retailer
    [16:44:58] Jigsy, mhmm
    [16:45:02] one of the bigger electronic retailers in aus

    • Would not be a surprise to see this happen in the UK soon, considering it’s advocating for a “sexism” label to be applied on video games that depict women in a “negative” way (so that’s scantily-clad women, sexy women and violence towards women).

      BUT they have no problems with the above happening to men though!

  • j0eeyy_p

    Loving all the Islamophobia in this comments section…Is it any wonder that many SJWs/Feminists tend to ignore your arguments when you smear ill-informed hatred in your arguments?

    • DizzyGear

      Because all the recent deadly terrorist attacks in Europe have nothing to do with Islam am I right?

      Fuck off.

    • j0eeyy_p

      The issue is a very complicated one and simply cannot amount to one factor – which you say is Islam. While you are right that these people are claiming to be representative of Islam, no terrorist group is reprensative of one religion or any religion – would you say that Anders Breivik is representative of all Christians? Terrorism has no religion.

      Not to mention extremism like ISIS will only get worse if groups are maginalised, in part thanks to media propaganda and government policy (ie. more ableist hate crime thanks to governement and media demonisation of disabled/unemployed benefit claimants in the UK. Same shit, different group). Simply bombing countries and killing more people (both extremists and civilians) makes the remaining people even more resentful, and even more angry agaisnt the oppressor, in this case Western countries that choose to go out and bomb them with whatever weapons they have at their disposal.

      The marginalisation of Muslims is basically what happened with the Jews all over again – hopefully it does not end the same way, but it is looking very possible.

    • Mr0303

      Phobia is an irrational fear. There is nothing irrational about fearing Islam – it’s a hateful violent ideology and the worst religion by far.

    • j0eeyy_p

      I think if people have been influenced by the mainstream media to the point where they start believing that then rationally it can be justified, even though they have ultimately been misled by outlets that are supposed to be objective in theory. This can and does happen. The view of Islam that is portrayed in the media is that it is like that practised by ISIS and Middle Eastern countries – yes, their form of Islam is very conservative in comparison to the rest of the world, however they are not representative of Islam as a whole. I believe only 20% of Muslims are actually in these areas. It’s a good example as to how the media misrepresents things and in this case has made a bogeyman. Terrorism has no religion.

    • Mr0303

      If anything the media is suppressing the true face of Islam. We’re not talking about the Middle East any more. We just need to look at what’s happening in Europe this very week and take another look at the shooting in Orlando.

      Not to mention that the so called integrated Muslims still hold regressive beliefs. More than 50% of British Muslims think that being gay should be illegal and about 25% of them want Sharia Law in the UK. These are not the savages living in the desert, but modern educated man brainwashed by religion.

      https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/apr/11/british-muslims-strong-sense-of-belonging-poll-homosexuality-sharia-law

      Terrorism can be committed by anyone, but Islam is a pretty good motivator as we are consistently seeing these days. The Muslim terror attacks in France for the last 5 years are more than the combined terror attacks in the last 100 years.

      It’s a religion that didn’t have a reformation and is pushing people to commit atrocities.

    • Dgnfly

      Some ppl don’t care about the facts so they scream islamaphobia cause it makes them feel they can demonize open debate and sweep it under the carpet. If we look at the real facts its obvious but some people seem to be blind to these facts for their Feel good moments.

      Behold the so called moderate’s it remains a joke that with video like this ppl still love to look the other way and rater focus on the fantasy world then reality.
      http://louderwithcrowder.com/french-police-enter-muslim-no-go-zone-get-viciously-attacked/#.V5ocIKL3N0x

      But then again SJW/FEminists walk hand in hand with Islamists wether it be moderate or extremist
      .https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyotLRHMOIk

    • DizzyGear

      And just in case anyone is wondering. No, i was not joking about the German politian blaming the attacks on violent videogames in my earlier comment:

      http://politiek.tpo.nl/2016/07/24/duitse-cdaer-aanslagen-schuld-verhuftering-internet-en-first-person-shooters/

      http://omg.tpo.nl/2016/07/25/duitse-minister-snel-debat-gevaren-gewelddadige-videogames/

    • Dgnfly

      They’ll always blame video games even if study’s shows the opposite when it comes to violence. People are just afraid of the truth not bending to their warped mindset so they all just blame it on the fantasy world in todays world.

      Als je de nieuws al leest met merkel die allemaal van die massa moordernaar binnen wilt brengen en doen also er niets aan de hand is zou je denken dat somige mensen een echte waanidee van de wereld zelf hebben.

      met title’s als
      ”Merkel: Terroristen krijgen hun zin niet, wij blijven vluchtelingen opnemen”
      kan je als zien dat ze rechtstreeks in hun hand speel door nog meer gekken binnen te halen tegen de wensen van de bevolking.

    • j0eeyy_p

      You are right that Islam is still quite conservative, however there is nothing wrong with conservatism (likewise progressivism) as long as you don’t try to influence others to follow your practises.
      Not to mention the vast majority of Muslims across the world have not committed terrorist attacks. Members of marginalised groups are more likely to be detached from society and so are drawn to terrorism. Same with any group.
      France continues to react to the terrorist attacks by increasing their war participantion in Iraq and Syria which is exactly what ISIS want. The attention and hatred so they can radicalise more people in and out of the Middle East. More bloodshed and destruction. It’s a deadly cycle and Western governments, especially the UK, US and France, only have themselves to blame when more of their citizens die.
      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jul/17/francois-hollande-pleads-for-unity-amid-anger-over-nice-attack

    • Mr0303

      “as long as you don’t try to influence others to follow your practises.” – did you miss the poll that I linked? It stated that 23% of muslims here want Sharia law.

      “Members of marginalised groups are more likely to be detached from society and so are drawn to terrorism.” – and that somehow excuses their actions? Those people have agency and whatever they do it’s on them.

      “US and France, only have themselves to blame when more of their citizens die.” – I partially agree, but its because they are allowing uncontrolled emigration and the formation of muslim ghettos. Importing people with culture which is incompatible with Western values is a huge mistake.

      Also the whole military complex excuse (which shouldn’t really be an excuse) falls apart since most of the terror attacks in the West are committed by locally raised muslims. If we look at attacks like Charlie Hebdo they have nothing to do with foreign politics and everything to do with a hateful religion.

    • j0eeyy_p

      I did look at it, but I found because the data is quantitative it dosen’t explain the individual reasons behind why these Muslims may or may not want Sharia Law. Until we have that kind of information, it’s hard to draw any detailed conclusions from that study. It’s still an interesting statistic however, and I’d like to see more detailed interviews done on the subject with Muslims on both sides.

      Of course it dosen’t. But if the reasons why these people are marginalised can be found and combated then it may lead to a decrease in marginalisation and subsequent deviance from society, no matter what form.

      But why would all these people come though? My guess is that they have a higher quality of life here then they do back home. If there’s no opportunities in somebody’s home country for whatever reason, they will go elsewhere. While many in Iraq/Syria etc. may come due to be safer due to war, people may leave the UK due to wage repression and poorer economic prospects, for instance. The reasons may be different, but they all intersect in some way. I do agree that government policy needs to be reassessed though, as there needs to be a balance but not discrimination. I don’t believe that any one factor is the cause of the problems surrounding Muslims, so even if Islam is itself the problem it’s not the only factor.

    • Mr0303

      Their individual reasons don’t really matter. Sharia Law has no place in any Western democracy – with it comes the oppression of men, women and the systematic murder of homosexuals.

      “But if the reasons why these people are marginalised can be found and combated then it may lead to a decrease in marginalisation and subsequent deviance from society, no matter what form.” – they are not marginalised. There are 2 billion muslims on the planet. They are in no way a minority that suffers oppression. People’s attitudes towards them are because of their adherence to a regressive death cult.

      “I don’t believe that any one factor is the cause of the problems surrounding Muslims, so even if Islam is itself the problem it’s not the only factor.” – whether you believe it or not it is the common factor that motivates these attacks.

    • Nin

      Frankly speaking, all you need is a textbook to know that Islam has always had issues.

      They are an issue to everywhere that has a significant minority, even moreso than people of other religions.

      Normally, I’m not an iconoclast, but the world would be better off if that space rock in Mecca was blown up.

    • j0eeyy_p

      Religions themselves aren’t the issue. The issue comes with how doctrine like the Bible and Quran are interpreted by the reader. This can very widely from mdoerates to extremism. This is something you will never be able to eradicate, no matter how much you try. Killing off one group of religious extremists will just replace them with another group, the same religion or otherwise.

    • Mr0303

      “Religions themselves aren’t the issue.” – yes, it’s one specific religion that’s the issue. You don’t see Christians or Buddhists blowing themselves up or throwing gays off of buildings.

    • Daymon

      Christians might not be blowing themselves up, but here in America, they certainly have committed horrible hate crimes against the LGBT community. Sure, they don’t throw us off of buildings. I guess it’s less barbaric that they drag us behind pick up trucks until we die?

    • Mr0303

      Citation needed. Is it a common Christian practice to do so?

      Inversely in 17 muslim countries the punishment for being gay is death, according to Sharia law. I doubt there is something similar in the West.

    • Daymon

      I’m not going to say it’s common Christian practice to do so, no. But there are countless instances of Christians in my country brutally attacking and, at times, murdering members of the LGBT community because they believe it violates their religious faith.

      As far as I can find, only 8 countries with the Muslim majority have it as law that homosexuality carry the death sentence, and even then, it’s not always carried out that way. From what I can tell, there are many countries in which same-sex pairings (or at least intercourse) is not illegal, and a few actually have anti-discrimination laws. I need to find some more legit sources for that, so let me do some more digging.

      This is just opinion here, so feel free to disagree, but I fail to see how the leading elite in a handful of admittedly regressive countries somehow gets to be the representatives of an entire religion? Religious zealots who have seized power or have been in power for a long time are of course going to be extreme – but that doesn’t mean that every person living under that regime agrees with that way of thinking. One group of people shouldn’t be defined by either extremists or those in power.

    • Mr0303

      “I’m not going to say it’s common Christian practice to do so, no. But there are countless instances of Christians in my country brutally attacking and, at times, murdering members of the LGBT community because they believe it violates their religious faith.” – and muslim attacks dwarf those supposedly countless numbers. The shooting in Orlando was one of the deadliest attacks in the US and it alone has more victims than all the LGBT attacks in the last 6 years in the US. The violence of the two religions is not equivalent and it is dishonest to claim so.

      Even if it is “just” 8 countries where Sharia Law is implemented doesn’t that tell you something? In the UK the church and the state are not separated like in the US, but there are no public gay executions in the street. This is because Christianity had a reformation, while Islam didn’t and has actually regressed.

      This is a poll conducted among muslims in the UK, not in the regressive countries, but supposedly modern people living in a Christian Western democracy.

      https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/apr/11/british-muslims-strong-sense-of-belonging-poll-homosexuality-sharia-law

      More than 50% of British muslims think that being gay should be illegal and about 25% of them want Sharia Law in the UK. These are not the savages living in the desert, but modern educated men and women brainwashed by religion. I’m not saying that all muslims should be labeled terrorists, but their bad ideas should be challenged. So far it seems that Islam is incompatible with Western values. Christianity, Buddhism and other religions haven’t murdered anyone for making a caricature of their prophet, so I think it is fair to say that Islam has some serious issues that need to be addressed.

    • Daymon

      The Pulse shooting was indeed horrific – carried out by a man who was born in America and who, until the shooting happened, apparently wasn’t religious at all. He was inspired by the extremists, not by the Islamic religion itself.

      And I’m not trying to say that the violence carried out is equal by any means. I’m saying you can’t compare the few to the many. I won’t disagree that the violence carried out by the extremists are large in scale, especially compared to Christian extremists, but again, it’s being carried out by a small portion compared to the whole. Personally, I think it’s important to differentiate between radicals/extremists and, from what I can tell, is the majority of people who don’t believe that way.

      As for polling… I get why it’s important, but it’s deeply, deeply flawed. I could go conduct a poll right now that proves the exact opposite of all that information. Namely, that link doesn’t discuss what each person’s interpretation of Sharia Law is. Just look at the Muslim-ruled countries, where it can vary wildly.

      Bad ideas, even religious ones, should absolutely be challenged. And in some areas, it does appear that some aspects of Islam is not quite compatible with Western views – but the same can be said of Christianity here in America. It may not be as violent as wanting to kill them, but it’s still a desire to oppress. Hell, several of the planks in the GOP platform are expressly seeking to remove rights from people in the name of the Christianity. They don’t want to kill us like some radical Muslims do – they just want us to live beneath them and know our place.

    • Mr0303

      Nope. He was religious. He shoulted “Allahu Akbar” and pledged his allegiance to ISIS before shooting up the club. There is no denying that.

      If they believe in the doctrine of Islam, then they believe that everything written in the Quran is the word of god including the jihad, the hate for homosexuals and the poor treatment of women. Whether they act on it is a different matter, but ignoring the problem is not a solution. The problem isn’t terrorists – it’s Islam.

      “As for polling… I get why it’s important, but it’s deeply, deeply flawed. I could go conduct a poll right now that proves the exact opposite of all that information. Namely, that link doesn’t discuss what each person’s interpretation of Sharia Law is. Just look at the Muslim-ruled countries, where it can vary wildly.” – until you conduct your own research I’m afraid the numbers support me. I don’t care what each individual’s interpretation is – religious law has no place ruling any country.

      So what’s you point with constantly bringing up Christianity? I think we already established that Islam is way worse, which was my position in the first place. Plus you have separation of Church and state in the US so I don’t think you’ll be living beneath them (whatever that means) any time soon.

    • Daymon

      I’ll have to disagree that shouting that inherently makes him religious. I suppose all we really have is the testimonial of family members to go by, so I shouldn’t claim he’s one way or the other.

      Mostly my point in bringing up Christianity so much was because you said that other religions don’t do things that Islam does. Which, to be fair, in the modern day, you are correct that certain followers of the Islamic religion are far more violent than their Christian counterparts. But I still draw parallels – belief that scripture dictates law, that certain groups of people are beneath them, and that certain groups of people don’t deserve the same rights because religion says so. Separation of church and state is a beautiful dream in America, but that doesn’t mean that religion-based laws aren’t enacted. Many discrimination laws here are written from a direct belief taken from the Christian bible. And while some of them have been repealed, there are politicians who are actively working to bring them back in the name of Christianity. Muslim extremists may want to throw me off a building or blow me up, while their Christian counterparts in American government simply want to strip me of my rights. Both are extreme, in my opinion, just in different ways.

    • Nin

      Rights are a deist (a type of religion) concept, bluntly speaking. Would I like a state to give me certain rights? Of course! Does it HAVE to? No, from a purely secular standpoint.

      Also, there are various non-religious reasons to discourage homosexuality and such due to abnormal depression and STD rates, the testimony of children raised by homosexuals, and its mostly non-genetic origin. I certainly don’t condone executions or even outright illegalization, but it shouldn’t be assumed to be normal human behavior and treated as such.

    • Daymon

      Rights should, once enacted, be equally applied. In my opinion.

      As for the rest of that… I… I don’t know what to say.

    • Mr0303

      “I’ll have to disagree that shouting that inherently makes him religious.” – you can’t be serious. Dying for the glory of your god and pledging allegiance to the Islamic state before committing the crime doesn’t make him religious? Wow.

      Yeah, I think people trying to murder you are much more dangerous than a couple of politicians that will try (and fail) to pass a law.

    • Daymon

      From reports, he wasn’t a practicing Muslim before the attack, didn’t follow its teachings or anything. Making a radical switch right at the end doesn’t mean that you’re religious. I still think he was inspired by the Islamic state, wanted to be a part of it, but up until that point in time, it doesn’t appear that religion had much to do with his life at all. Again – this is all just my personal opinion.

      And like I said, it’s not the same – different types of extremists. But I’d hardly call it a few politicians – it’s an entire political movement that very well may achieve their goals. People have been underestimating them this entire time, and now they’re potentially ready to scoop up a great deal of power.

    • Mr0303

      I’m sorry, but that’s pretty weak reasoning. Even if he was relgious for the last 5 seconds of his life, the underlying reason for the crime is still Islam.

      “People have been underestimating them this entire time, and now they’re potentially ready to scoop up a great deal of power.” – that’s a pretty paranoid statement considering that homosexuals are consistently getting more rights and I don’t think that there are many left that are exclusive to heterosexual people.

    • Daymon

      It could be weak – but it’s the reasoning I believe in right now. I’m willing to look more into this guy and what happened, and just how influenced by the religion of Islam he was.

      And I know I sound paranoid. Trust me, I do. But it’s increasingly hard not to be. America has been great in advancing the rights of the LGBT community for a while now, making it, in my opinion, pretty damn equal with the heterosexual community. I’m not pushing to get any new rights – I’m worried the rights that we’ve been given will be rescinded. The next POTUS gets to determine the next (or more, the Justices are old) Justice for the Supreme Court. It’s unlikely that they would overturn their previous rulings – but not impossible. With the GOP platform in place and the man at its helm, I think a dash of paranoia is a little understandable.

    • Mr0303

      “It could be weak – but it’s the reasoning I believe in right now.” – OK, as long as you realise that. Just know that he’s not an isolated incident and duck if you hear “Allahu Akbar!”.

    • Daymon

      Hey, I’m not perfect, and I’m not saying my opinions are perfect. You’ve challenged me to look at them closer, so I’ll at least take that away from this.

    • Mr0303

      No worries, man. Thanks for approaching the issue with an open mind.

    • Daymon

      Hey, I know it’s cheesy, but I actually really like listening to dissenting opinions. It makes a person look at their thoughts and reasoning, and sometimes even makes them change it. Thanks for being a reasonable human being.