Nintendo Announces Their Newest Project: Nintendo Labo

Wednesday, January 17th, 2018

Share this page

We are proudly a Play-Asia Partner

SUPPORT OPRAINFALL BY TURNING OFF ADBLOCK

Ads support the website by covering server and domain costs. We're just a group of gamers here, like you, doing what we love to do: playing video games and bringing y'all niche goodness. So, if you like what we do and want to help us out, make an exception by turning off AdBlock for our website. In return, we promise to keep intrusive ads, such as pop-ups, off oprainfall. Thanks, everyone!

By


Nintendo Labo

Today, Nintendo announced their latest project, the random and off-the-wall idea now known as Nintendo Labo. It is a rather creative idea to be sure, with a target audience of kids 6-12 years old and those who are kids at heart. So what is it exactly? Well, Nintendo Labo currently comes in two kits that you can purchase for use with the Nintendo Switch console. The kits come with cardboard parts that you can use to build little creations (called Toy-Cons) that work with the Switch console. The kit also comes with some software for the Switch to make it work with your new creations.

In addition to the two creation kits, there will also be a customization kit containing stencils, stickers and colored tape. The customization kit will sell for $9.99. All three of these kits will launch on April 20th. Nintendo is also planning some live, hands-on events called Labo Studio in San Francisco, and New York City. You can enter for a chance to attend the 3-hour event by going to that link. You have to enter by 11:59 PM Pacific Time on January 21st. The event will take place on February 2-3rd in New York City, and on March 3-4th in San Francisco. Additionally, Nintendo has also released a trailer for Nintendo Labo, and here it is:

 

The first Nintendo Labo kit is the Variety Kit, which will sell for a suggested price of $69.99. This kit features five things you can build. One is an RC car that you put the Joy-Cons in and then control it with the Switch console. You can do some leasiurely fishing using the fishing rod Toy-Con. You can also build a house, a motorbike, and a working cardboard piano with this kit.

Nintendo Lab - Fishing Rod

 

The second Nintendo Labokit is the Robot Kit, which will sell for $79.99. This set allows you to build a wearable robo-suit. You can insert the Joy-Cons and then use it to control the robot on the TV screen (when the Switch is in the dock). The software that comes with the kit includes a number of gameplay scenarios, including destroying buildings and UFOs using your robosuit.

Nintendo Labo - Robosuit

 

Nintendo Labo is certainly a creative idea, and pretty off-the-wall and unexpected. Having some nieces and nephews of my own, I’m not sure how long it would entertain them, though. There is also the issue of the cardboard getting damaged or destroyed. You’d probably want to keep the cardboard Toy-Cons in a safe place when not in use if a younger kid is involved (since cardboard is a bit fragile). If the cardboard gets ruined, then you’ll just have to play the game without it, which will not give quite the same experience of course.

Nintendo Labo - Pianno

 

It is also likely that the software that comes with the Nintendo Labo kits is not what you’d call a full game. That, combined with the fact that the rest of the kit is just carboard, and a few rubber bands and things makes it seem as though the kits may be a bit over-priced. Nonetheless, it is certainly a new and creative idea that Nintendo has come up with.

About Michael Fontanini

Michael is a veteran gamer in my early 30s, who grew up around video games, with fond memories of the oldies like the NES and SNES. He loves Nintendo but also plays a lot of games on his PC. Michael also enjoys going for walks or bike rides, and loves animals.

Michael is also a computer programmer. This started with a toy he got as a kid called PreComputer 1000 that was made by V-Tech. It had a simple programming mode which is what started him down the road of being a programmer! Michael can program in BASIC, Visual Basic, C++, C#, and is familiar with Java and Lua Script.

Putting programming and gaming together, Michael became a hobbyist game developer which may give him some good insights on game development! Most recently, he has been playing with the free version of the Unity engine (a powerful and easy-to-use game engine).

I love Nintendo but I also play a lot of game's on PC, many of which are on steam. My favorite Nintendo game's include Zelda, Metroid, and Smash Bros to name a few. On PC I love the Half-Life games, as well as most all of the Source Engine games just to name a few.