Xbox Boss Phil Spencer Explains Scalebound Cancellation

Tuesday, June 13th, 2017

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Scalebound

 

You may recall the cancellation of Scalebound, and Xbox Boss, Phil Spencer, apologizing to the fans. Scalebound was being developed by Platinum Games under the umbrella of Microsoft Game Studios. Not much was explained at the time other than the decision was made “after careful deliberation.” but now Xbox Boss, Phil Spencer has changed that in an interview with the Japanese Game site GameWatch.

Spencer mentioned that he shares the fans’ disappointment over the cancellation, and that he has great respect for everyone at Platinum Games. During the long period that Platinum Games and Microsoft worked together on Scalebound, they learned a lot from one another. Spencer says Platinum Games is a unique game studio and that he hopes to work with Hideki Kamiya again.

 

As for what went wrong and lead to the cancellation of Scalebound, Spencer thinks part of the problem was that the game was announced too soon. This put a lot of extra pressure on Platinum Games, which “strives to create huge games that have no equal among existing titles in things like size, scale of multiplayer and more.” The early announcement influenced the development cycle, raised hurdles. In the end, both Platinum Games and Microsoft became doubtful about whether the game could offer what fans wanted.

In the same interview, Spencer also said he believes that Japanese developers need to be more open to the world, like Hajime Tabata’s Final Fantasy XV team. He also wants to say “Come back home” to those developers who have quit creating for consoles in order to bring their games to mobile platforms. Has said he has noticed that the amount of developers coming back to consoles does seem to be on the rise. Spencer also thinks that Japanese gamers are becoming more interested in console gaming again, thanks in part to the success of the Nintendo Switch.

 

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About Michael Fontanini

Michael is a veteran gamer in my early 30s, who grew up around video games, with fond memories of the oldies like the NES and SNES. He loves Nintendo but also plays a lot of games on his PC. Michael also enjoys going for walks or bike rides, and loves animals.

Michael is also a computer programmer. This started with a toy he got as a kid called PreComputer 1000 that was made by V-Tech. It had a simple programming mode which is what started him down the road of being a programmer! Michael can program in BASIC, Visual Basic, C++, C#, and is familiar with Java and Lua Script.

Putting programming and gaming together, Michael became a hobbyist game developer which may give him some good insights on game development! Most recently, he has been playing with the free version of the Unity engine (a powerful and easy-to-use game engine).

I love Nintendo but I also play a lot of game's on PC, many of which are on steam. My favorite Nintendo game's include Zelda, Metroid, and Smash Bros to name a few. On PC I love the Half-Life games, as well as most all of the Source Engine games just to name a few.




  • Landale

    “Japanese developers need to be more open to the world”
    Something about that phrase doesn’t sit well with me.

    • NegativeZero

      Don’t want to talk for Phil, but I think he was meaning open as in transparent, not open as in taking outside influence (though Japanese developers could definitely do with being more open in terms of sharing tools and ideas!).

      Tabata was notably quite open about how they were developing FFXV, lots of livestreams with direct Q&A with fans and the like. Naoki Yoshida probably deserves the credit for pioneering this approach at Squenix with his FFXIV directs, and it’s something I think other developers could do with emulating.

    • Landale

      I’d be more willing to believe that if they had brought up SE in general, since as you say more than one team is pretty open in that manner, if it weren’t for the obvious BS of “We canceled it because we announced it early and that caused us problems.”. As if delays and dropped concepts aren’t a frequent thing in games.

    • Geebun

      I sure hope they don’t share that idea. Japanese games feeling “japanese” are the reason I play the games and don’t play many western games outside of indies and some rare AAAs.

  • Mr0303

    Most of that explanation is PR speak, but that’s understandable – the business reasons behind the cancellation will never be known.