More Costume Changes Discovered in Bravely Second

Monday, February 29th, 2016

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Bravely Second Costume Change

The saga of Bravely Second changes in the West receives a new chapter today. A user has made an extensive pastebin post listing all the costume changes made in the game. They did some looking around in the game’s files to discover from the development side what all was changed. A couple of the changes were not even noticed on the European version until the changes were found via this method. Most of them definitely were, however. While none of them were as extensive as the one changing the Native American class to a Cowboy, the changes are pretty extensive. All of the changes seem to revolve around covering up cleavage and upper legs and hips of female characters. A good video showing many of those changes has been posted by Censored Gaming.

Let us know in the comments what you think about the newest round of changes in this localization. And stay tuned at Operation Rainfall for any further developments in this story.

About William Haderlie

Born in the 1970's, I've been an avid participant for much of video game history. A lifetime of being the sort of supergeek entrenched in the sciences and mathematics has not curbed my appreciation for the artistry of video games, cinema, and especially literature.




  • Joey

    When will those scumbags start respecting the source material rather than cutting it up?!

  • Andrew Arndt

    its just stuiped to whine about is stuiped as well. im sick of it really in genral keep it as it should be geesh,

  • azariosays

    NoA believes all woman should be covered up it seems. I’ve cancelled my pre-order, I will not support this companies dishonesty with their fans, sorry, we aren’t fans to them we are consumers, so, and leaving it up to their consumers to just stumble across their edits and censorship. At least smaller localization pubs have the means to come out months ahead and say “look this is happening” Nintendo can’t even respect pationate gamers to that extent. Well in that case I urge everyone to cancel their pre order so we don’t have to wait and see what they change in two months with the American release.

    This isn’t about taking away costumes with me, it’s about respect and this company shows 0 to any one who supports them.

    • PanurgeJr

      I’m keeping my preorder. Mostly to enjoy the game, but there is the added bonus of knowing I’m ignoring your plea.

    • azariosays

      Lol okay

    • PanurgeJr

      tl;dr

    • Wolfe

      You’re a dope.

    • PanurgeJr

      Remove the article and you’re spot on.

    • Wolfe

      Nah. I’m just spot on, dope.

    • David S

      Well, you seem like a right pleasant fellow.

    • PanurgeJr

      It’s very pleasant ignoring the absurd.

    • Sylveria Shini

      Ignoring by camping a thread and posting in it several times.

    • Stilzkin

      You sure showed him

    • DanijoEX ♬ the Cosmic Owlzilla

      Shouldn’t we blame Square Enix? I mean, this is a Square Enix game after all.

      Although, i don’t know if Nintendo really is responsible for the censoring. But Square might have done it themselves. They did with Bravely Default.

    • Steve Baltimore

      It’s a hard call on this one TBH, Square had a third party localize the first game and I’m not sure who did this one.

    • DanijoEX ♬ the Cosmic Owlzilla

      Usually if Nintendo censors a game. It’s usually their own. Especially in FE: Fates case.

    • Steve Baltimore

      They could have requested Square make these changes or Square just decided to do it. We’ll probably never know.

    • DanijoEX ♬ the Cosmic Owlzilla

      That would be likely. But, like you said, we’ll never know.

    • azariosays

      We will when I have a meeting with them next month at FFVX event and then again I’ll be meeting with that at E3. I need to find out who is in charge of these changes. Square might have had a hand in this as well, but Koei kept silent about FFV so we are all in the dark at this point.

    • David S

      I’d ask for you to relay some choice comments I have, but I think you mouth might catch fire if you were to actually utter them aloud.

      So in their stead, please let them know that things like this are rapidly eroding faith in their company and games. As is, I’m skipping Bravely Second and I’m very worried about what will be done to Star Ocean and FFXV in localization. I will not be pre-ordering either directly due to what has been done to Bravely Second, and if it turns out they are also ‘localized ‘ in this fashion I will be skipping them as well, and will be urging others to do the same.

    • tBanzai

      Right on! Keep digging that dig! I love you.

    • William Haderlie

      I would have been happy to state the originating party in the piece. But unfortunately I do not know who is making these decisions. It would be interesting to find out, I agree.

    • Archer

      Look, I totally support your choice to not purchase this title. We all have the ways in which we protest the ongoing censorship issues. But I think it’s kind of crappy to urge everybody to follow your example, especially when the site has repeatedly stressed that they aren’t trying to get people to not buy a game. You have a lot of influence on this site, a lot of presence, and are pretty much synonymous with the site at this point.

      I’m not arguing the fact that costumes were changed and/or censored, but we don’t know who did it. Placing the blame solely on Nintendo and telling people to cancel their pre-orders because it’s Nintendo’s fault is a bit much.

    • David S

      I think it’s equally crappy to urge people to swallow their displeasure with the direction the localization is going and just accept the censored game. And if you’re talking about influence, most of the gaming publications already, openly, tell people that they should accept thes localization despite their complaints.

    • Archer

      I never said anything about swallowing anything, or accepting it. I certainly don’t, and I don’t encourage anybody else to do that either.

      Isn’t that kind of influence you’re talking about the very thing we’re trying to fight? Why is it not okay for a major publication to do it, but it should be alright for a small one?

      I have absolutely zero issue with his stance. Had that comment been made on any personal blog/social media outlet, this would be a non-issue for me. I don’t think anybody, big or small, should be using their influence in such a way. Shouldn’t we hold ourselves to the same standards as the people we’re up against?

    • Archer

      Edit: “Shouldn’t we hold ourselves to the same standards as the people we’re up against?” Might be worded a bit poorly. I mean to say that if we have standards that we expect of them, we should expect the same of ourselves.

    • TrueWiiMaster

      If you played Xenoblade, you know that’s not true. They changed Lin’s because she was a kid, but there are still revealing costumes in the game for the other characters.

      I fail to see the dishonesty here (aside from your first sentence). Did they say at some point that they were bringing the Japanese game over completely unchanged?

      It’s quite insulting to suggest that people who don’t care about these changes (or don’t care enough to skip the game, at least) are somehow less passionate about gaming.

      Also, it’s pretty awkward for an admin, on this site of all places, to openly discourage support for a localized JRPG. Operation Rainfall was started to support such games, not hurt them.

    • Stilzkin

      “Did they say at some point that they were bringing the Japanese game over completely unchanged?”

      It should be expected. If you spent money on this garbage you are activaly encouraging them to butcher jap games. So yes, you are less passionate about gaming because you reward that kind of behaviour or just have a weak will.

    • Archer

      I’m very much against censorship and bad localization choices, but I don’t think people who still buy the game are weak willed or less passionate. Everybody has their own way of fighting censorship, from boycotting to letter writing to whatever. Just because somebody buys a game doesn’t mean that they support censorship – some people do it to show support for the developer, who may not have had any control over what happened to the finished product.

    • TrueWiiMaster

      Why should it be expected?

      Actually, no. If you buy Bravely Second, you’re supporting the Bravely franchise and its developer first and foremost. In the same way, if you skip the game, and encourage others to do the same, you’re hurting the Bravely franchise and its developers first and foremost. Besides, it could be argued that buyers are more passionate than boycotters, because buyers put the games they want ahead of trivialities like the amount of skin you can see on the characters. As for me, I would buy this game whether it was changed or unchanged, as long as it was good. I don’t play games specifically to have the pure, unaltered Japanese experiences, I play games to enjoy games.

    • Stilzkin

      Not if I import the jap version. Mindless consumers with no principles are destroying the industry.

    • TrueWiiMaster

      If you encourage others to skip it, and they don’t buy the Japanese version, you’re still hurting the developer and franchise, probably more than you’re hurting the localization teams.

      Really? I think publishers with greedy business practices, and those who support them, are the ones hurting the industry the most. Things like pay-to-win, on-disc DLC, withheld content, and broken-at-launch games are much worse for gaming than slightly altered JRPG’s.

    • Stilzkin

      These are are the things I meant, along with bad localization and translation. It’s all on the same shit level and people need to stop rewarding this kind of bad behaviour

    • Hogtree Octovish

      They also removed the breast adjuster for the female player character (or are you wilfully forgetting that).
      As well as the Waifu/Husbando-Amie minigame from Fire Emblem Fates.

      And no, they didn’t explicitly say it, but it’s heavily implied that a good translation would feature as little changes as possible (mainly just the language [from Japanese to English, obviously], in my opinion) to the original product.

      And I don’t think he’s saying that.
      It’s mainly you and Panurge that are bringing the “true fan” argument in here.

    • TrueWiiMaster

      I wasn’t “willfully forgetting” it. I was just talking about costumes, not character creation. The same thing goes for the Fire Emblem mini-game.

      Translation and localization are not the same thing. Translations are supposed to be the same text, but in a different language. Localizations are about preparing a game for a new audience.

      He specifically said that Nintendo is disrespecting passionate gamers by making changes, suggesting people who take no disrespect aren’t passionate. Under a different article, he said that Nintendo was being rude to “true gamers”, which is what he called people who order special editions. Either I’m reading too much into his comments (entirely possible), or he is indeed trying to quantify how “true” or “passionate” a fan is.

    • Vanadise

      Note that in XCX, the fundoshi costume was censored on all characters, including adult females and males, too. The pro-censorship crowd likes to focus on Lin because it’s easy to convince people that those changes are morally justifiable.

    • TrueWiiMaster

      I think I saw that somewhere. I was surprised, because there are a lot of other revealing costumes that aren’t censored. I don’t know why that one specifically was changed. Maybe because it was the most revealing male outfit?

      I wouldn’t call myself “pro-censorship”. I don’t celebrate the changes. I just don’t care about them enough to skip a great game I want to play. Changed or unchanged, I wouldn’t have skipped them either way.

    • tBanzai

      Well, given the rationalization for changing a washtub into a bucket in Mario & Luigi:Partners In Time they gave here:

      http://imgur.com/aEvihFi/

      I wouldn’t be surprised if they removed the fundoshi because they assumed that american audiences wouldn’t understand fundoshi.

      Nintendo’s always has been and likely always will be off the mark about these things.

    • TrueWiiMaster

      That’s just weird. I guess they thought the joke translated better as a bucket falling, which is kind of the American equivalent to the washtub joke (you know, setting up a bucket of water over a door), but it’s such a little detail.

      The fundoshi thing is weird too. I mean, obviously most westerners wouldn’t recognize it, but they really don’t need to. It’s not like the costumes are all based on recognizable clothing.

    • tBanzai

      The thing that most puzzles me about the fundoshi is that they named the equipment “Six Stars Ritual Bodywear” with the “ritual” part being a reference to its eastern origin. Then they changed it to something about as uneastern/unritual as they can get. The default trunks.

      I’m also thinking that these changes, the boob slider and all, might have to do with Nintendo not wanting anyone to see a character of Lin’s proportions with their buttocks exposed. As the Fundoshi could be equipped to Lin that was a problem. As someone could just use the breast slider to reduce breast size and make a character with similar proportions to Lin and wear skimpy costumes, that was a problem.

      Honestly, there were so many other weird changes in the game like renaming all of the various organizations in the game as well as removing certain religious references (AND MEMES). I find it hard to rationalize any of it.

    • tBanzai

      Not only that, but it’s also incredibly disrepectful of the artists who put their time and effort into these games to alter their work like this. Leave the stuff as the developers intended, it’s really as simple as that.

    • Ragunaxl

      I am sorry you are so bold as to go on public record over to side against a company deciding to fully cloth toddler shaped game characters. Women? I say tey are little girls. Sick. Down vote this, it’s not censorship in the least…

  • PanurgeJr

    Still not censorship…

    • azariosays

      They’re covering woman up right in front of your eyes. How is that not censorship? I hope this is a joke.

    • PanurgeJr

      No, the joke is how many people claim something is censorship in complete ignorance of what they’re talking about. It’s not censorship because it’s the decision of the publisher. They bought the right to make that decision when they funded the project.

    • Steve Baltimore

      Self censorship is still censorship.

    • PanurgeJr

      In the same way a seahorse is a horse.

    • Steve Baltimore

      If it’s in development and they change it cause they don’t like it that’s one thing. It is something completely different to take an existing product and cut out what you think will be problematic.

    • PanurgeJr

      When you’re the publisher changing the product remains development. So by your first statement you agree with me.

    • Steve Baltimore

      Localization is not development. In fact most localization teams have to send games back to Japan to have changes made to them.

    • Speed12345

      This is one of dumbest arguments I heard in my entire life. Why you don’t admit you are a pro-censorship already?

      Changing clothes in order to hide cleavage and show less skin is not censorship? Changing story for avoiding deaths or bad events is not censorship? What’s the next? Are you going to say censorship doesn’t is not real?

    • Vanadise

      http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/censor?s=t

      “Censorship” is when a part of something is removed on military, political, or moral grounds.

      It is entirely possible to censor yourself. Even in this case, Nintendo is a large company — it’s quite a stretch if you’re going to claim that the people who made the decision during localization are the same people who actually created the content.

      Costumes are being removed and replaced with ones that are less morally objectionable by official employees of Nintendo. That fits the literal definition of censorship.

    • PanurgeJr

      Seriously? The publisher making changes literally *does not* fit the definition you just gave. An official is one in office; i. e. the government. Not the publisher. Seriously…

    • Vanadise

      It doesn’t specify “government” anywhere in there. Nintendo has offices. An official employee of Nintendo is an official.

    • PanurgeJr

      Congratulations. You win the 2016 prize for Most Ridiculous Twisting of Semantic Facts. You must be so proud. Call up to your mom; I’m sure she’s proud of you too.

    • Vanadise

      Apparently in this thread, adhering to the literal definition of a word is “ridiculous twisting of semantic facts.” Ok, we can go with that if it’s so important to convince yourself that this isn’t censorship.

    • PanurgeJr

      You haven’t adhered to the literal definition of anything. You have ignored the literal definition, and saying you haven’t doesn’t change that.

    • Vanadise

      But the only part I’m ignoring is where you’re trying to insert “government” even though it’s not there.

      For example, are you familiar with the Comics Code Authority? They are the de facto example of privatized self-censorship in the USA. The comics industry censored itself for the latter half of the 1900’s in the USA due to the CCA, without any government intervention — and I guarantee you will see the CCA in any list of major examples of censorship in the history of the USA.

    • Wolfe

      Only joke is here is you. And it’s a bad one.

      Fun fact: This kind of move now costs a company lots of sales. When dealing a niche genre like JRPGs, every sale counts.

      Now, I notice you like to go around saying, “I’ll buy it in your stead.” a lot. Well I hope you’ve got enough to compensate for everyone. Because trolling comments sections with your pro-censorship bullshit isn’t a purchase.

    • PanurgeJr

      What also costs a company lots of sales is for a small group of ignorant people to fall prey to a false narrative and boycott a game due to failure to understand what is actually going on. Are you going to recompense Nintendo for every lost sale due to misinformation you’re spreading?

    • Wolfe

      You, of all people have no business using the words ‘false narrative’ or ‘misinformation’.

      But since we’re such a clearly small subset of consumers (might wanna tell Forbes they’re a niche site, btw), there’s really no reason for you to sit here and play PR fetchboy, is there?

      Except it’s not just a handful of upset consumers. It’s a lot of them. And you know it. Which is why you are here doing your best damage control.

      Go ahead. I’ll wait for the usual standbys you PR/fanboys toss out. It’s fun to troll. I just like to make you angry, etc.

      Better up your game, boy.

    • tBanzai

      Honestly the guy’s just saying “it’s not censorship” just because people say it is. He’s being contrarian for the sake of being contrarian, as evidenced from the conversation I had with him before in one of these censorship articles where he ended up admitting that the reason why he was so adamant about his definition of actions like this not being censorship was because other people were calling it censorship.

      If anything you guys should either just ignore him or (probably not as contructive) just outright ban him from discussion here.

    • William Haderlie

      You are welcome to your opinion. I personally feel that it is censorship. But for a purely news related article I did not take a stance or call it one way or the other. Perhaps you will see some opinion based articles on this event in the future, but you are welcome to state your opinion in the comments to those as well. Thanks for at least taking the time to look at the article.

    • PanurgeJr

      While I see how it reads that I was responding to the article, I was in fact preemptively responding to the wave of accusations of censorship that I anticipated, clearly correctly. That said, the screenshot that links to the video mentions censorship twice, so drawing the conclusion that the concept has editorial support is not unreasonable.

      However, your comment does illustrate precisely why I’m so passionate about the entire affair. (And why I take such joy in trolling idiocy rather than simply finding it all a waste of time and moving on.) I have never once in any serious comment on this game, Xenoblade Chronicles X, Fatal Frame, or any other, done anything other than insist that people understand what censorship actually is, and what it isn’t, because allowing the misapplication of terms hinders true debate.

      And what I mean by that is this. For all that whoever in this thread quoted a literal definition of censorship (and then proceeded to ignore the parts that undermined what point he was trying to make), oftentimes it is not the literal denotation of a term that matters but the secondary connotations, and that is especially true of censorship. The term conjures up all sorts of images, from banned books to burned books, all of which are negative and some of which are especially heinous. They make the concept indefensible, as it well should be. Thus, the moment one allows the term to apply to a situation, like the localization of Bravely Second, is the moment one concedes that the situation is indefensible as well.

      Similar comments apply to something you said as well. What censorship is isn’t really a matter of opinion, but if I allow you to make the claim that it is I have to accept once again that the localization under discussion is indefensible. You would win a debate not by debating but by maneuvering the discussion into a place where you don’t have to debate; note that you’d also have transformed a discussion into a pre-won debate in the first place.

      I’m all for discussing localization, both generally and in specific cases. I’m willing to concede any reaction people may have, again either to the general process or to specific results. But I will not allow people to misuse terms in a manner designed to shut out anyone who disagrees with them.

    • Figuratively Shaking

      “I’m all for discussing localization”

      Which is why you allow discussion to happen and don’t cut it off immediately by whining, for hours, about the usage of a word you don’t like.

    • PanurgeJr

      Curious response, given that I explained why usage was important.

    • Figuratively Shaking

      I don’t think it’s curious. It’s a very typical response to a very common person. Perhaps slightly more blindly hypocritical than usual, but common nonetheless.

    • Archer

      I can kind of see where you’re coming from. It’s kind of like when somebody calls another person an SJW as though it ends the discussion.

      I think that it’s okay to have a personal definition for the word “censorship” though. I mean, it kind of inherently is going to mean different things to different people. Coming from areas where censorship is tyranically enforced by government and is sometimes enforced by imprisonment, issues such as these likely seem petty and they may not be viewed as censorship. So long as the word itself isn’t being used to simply loop around in endless circles with no actual discussion, I think it’s okay to have a differing opinion on the meaning and scope of the word.

    • PanurgeJr

      Words will naturally vary in scope from person to person, but that is not what I was objecting to (which would be like objecting to gravity). “Censorship” is so loaded with connotations that when discussing it a syllogism is virtually automatic:

      1. This event is censorship.

      immediately becomes:

      1. This event is censorship.
      2. Censorship is bad.
      3. Therefore, this event is bad.

      Everyone agrees to 2, and 3 logically follows from 1 and 2 together, so granting 1 is granting 3 as well.

      But what if your concept of censorship is broader, and you accept, as at least one commenter here apparently does, that self-censorship is still censorship? That would be perfectly reasonable, defensible, and consistent–but then censorship wouldn’t be inherently bad, because sometimes self-censorship is a good thing. 2 in the syllogism above wouldn’t hold, but the problem then becomes that everyone argues as though it does, which is deceitful debate. Every comment I’ve read here has counted on the connotations censorship has, and since I don’t have the inclination to fight them, what’s left is to deny the term applies in the first place.

    • Archer

      Fair enough! I misunderstood your original message. I understand your point better now. And I think I do see where your coming from a little better.

      I like to think that I’m a moderate. While I’m no fan of censorship, I’ve seen (on both sides of the fence!) people use the negative connotations and the “weight” behind a word as the strength of the debate or discussion. It’s never a debate or discussion. In fact, I find boiling the issue down to the bare bones skeleton (the “censorship is censorship is censorship” vs the “it’s not censorship it’s not censorship it’s not censorship” argument) doesn’t further the discussion in any way. I don’t like to leave it at “it’s censorship.” It’s important to discuss why it is or isn’t censorship, to look at the reasons the changes were made, the intent behind the change. The way we talk about it sometimes makes it sound like there’s a secret shadow society of hooded figures sitting around a table in a cave somewhere, plotting the destruction of video games. Haha.

    • PanurgeJr

      Thank you. You are literally the second person to understand what my purpose actually is, or at least the second to say so, since the Fatal Frame controversy, and probably before that.

      If you have time (and I mean that–the piece is long) I recommend reading “Stuck in the Middle” on pietriots.com. It’s an excellent account these issues.

    • Archer

      I’ll certainly take a look at it. Thanks for the little chat, and thanks for the recommended reading. 🙂

    • Vanadise

      What I’m getting out of this is, you believe that censorship must inherently be bad, but you think these changes are good; therefore, you resolve the cognitive dissonance by telling yourself and trying to convince others that this isn’t really censorship.

      What you need to realize here is that this is censorship and you believe it is good. That means you have two options:
      – Accept that this is censorship and that you believe it is good, and try to convince other people that it’s good
      – Accept that this change is bad even though it doesn’t bother you personally

      The first option seems to be what you want, but you understand that you’re not going to convince anybody unless you can change the word they’re using to describe it. Either way, refusing to accept the definition of a word is preventing you from having a useful conversation about it.

    • Figuratively Shaking

      Can you defend these actions in a way that’s not “that word you used to describe these actions might be wrong?” As of now all you’ve proven capable of doing is sidestepping any actual discussion to instead focus on something as irrelevant as the exact dictionary definition of a word.

  • Vanadise

    After Fire Emblem: Fates was even more bowdlerized than I expected, I’m done giving Nintendo money for censored games. I’ve canceled by Bravely Second preorder and will be buying it used.

  • Mr0303

    Pixelated cleavage is as dangerous as ever in Nintendoland it seems.

  • Wolfe

    I will not purchase censored games, regardless of developer or publisher.
    Additionally, I no longer do business with Nintendo of America.

    • Speed12345

      NoA needs a completely overhaul. The censorship campaign is growing day-by-day. What happened with Fatal Frame was ridiculous considering it’s a mature game. NoA killed the franchise in the west.

    • Wolfe

      Remove the Treehouse. Stop giving scripts to 8-4 Play.

  • Craig Sloat

    I’m not a fan of censorship however I do find these edits more tasteful and respectful to women.

    • William Haderlie

      I can understand why you would feel that way. But that is not actually why I’m personally against this behavior. I do not want to create an entirely safe society free of all offense. To make something unavailable to purchase is what I’m against. The creation of the material serves a purpose to those who created it and those who consume it. And I want the option to make the choice myself. “Ulysses” by James Joyce was a banned book for it’s first decade of existence. And it’s still a book that is not stocked in many libraries. While this is an extreme example, that is considered by many if not most critics as the greatest book ever written. I would consider that a crime if I was not able to still purchase it. Thanks to the judgement of Judge Woolsey on December 6, 1933, I can actually purchase it and it changed my life in certain ways. That does not mean that the book is any more or less offensive. But I was given the choice to read it and make my own judgement. I want to purchase Bravely Second myself and make my own judgement about the art style.

    • PanurgeJr

      Had a publisher paying Joyce directed him to make changes it wouldn’t have been censorship. Neither is this.

    • Wolfe

      That’s not for you, or anyone else to decide. No individual is a spokesperson for an entire gender.

    • PanurgeJr

      He’s not allowed to decide what he finds tasteful? That’s closer to censorship than the localization of Bravely Second. Nice to see the true colors I already knew would have been there.

    • Wolfe

      He’s entitled to an opinion. Just like everyone else.
      Applauding censorship, however, is just misguided.
      I await your inevitable, predictable response. Here. This should help:

    • PanurgeJr

      I’ve never defended censorship, nor applauded; I’ve just recognized when the word doesn’t apply. But I don’t see that option. Try again.

    • Wolfe

      Took ya 3 hours to try and cook up a way around that little meme and you still failed. I’d like to say ‘Well done’, but obviously I can’t.

      “Try again.” By all means, do.

    • PanurgeJr

      No, I spent those three hours doing other things, like longer responses to people who are worth my time. You got about five seconds, which is about five seconds more than you’re worth. In fact, I don’t even know why I’ve taken ten more now.

    • Wolfe

      Because you’re a hate-filled little shit who can’t stand it when people so easily make you look bad. Shit, I can feel you seething through the every letter above.
      Delicious.

    • PanurgeJr

      You find shit delicious?

    • Wolfe

      Aw man, you’re really bad at this.

    • PanurgeJr

      If that were true you wouldn’t be sitting around waiting for me so you could reply instantly. But I’ll admit, you’re wearing me down a bit, and I’m looking forward to your bedtime.

      BTW is your mom seeing anyone?

    • Wolfe

      Wow, a mom joke. I couldn’t ask for a more perfect cap to this.

    • Mr0303

      Won’t somebody think of the women?

    • Stilzkin

      They are not real

    • Speed12345

      I don’t see disrespect in the original clothes, plus, there are rumors about NoA censoring parts of the story too, for example, avoiding deaths.

    • Vanadise

      The important question here is: do you believe it’s ok for Nintendo of America to act as your moral guardian and decide what it’s ok for you to see just because you think these edits are tasteful? Is it acceptable for them to change a creator’s work away from their original intent in order to make it more “respectful”?

  • tBanzai

    Might want to look into some changes that are starting to come to the surface regards to the story as well. They took out an entire route in some subquests in order to sanitize the game of negative consequences due to player choice.

    http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/740205-bravely-second-end-layer/73362981/845451086

    If you can confirm that these changes happened and write an article on it, that’d be great too.

    • William Haderlie

      We did in a separate article, but thanks for the heads up.

  • Paychi

    There’s still a lot of people are missing the point here. Video games
    are a small aspect. Other companies and studios in all fields and
    mediums will think censorship is okay and successful. Look at what’s
    been happening to comic books. It will branch out to television and
    movies. Hell, Funimation is even getting in on the “politically correct”
    movement and they’re even redubbing anime to fit the backwards culture
    that’s trending in the US. The final step is to censor the internet and
    next thing you know we’re Australia (no offense, I feel for my Aussie
    brothers and sisters).

  • Josh S.

    I personally am okay with costume changes, but the other reported changes conern me…

  • Ragunaxl

    THIS IS AGAINST MY BASIC HUMAN RIGHTS! If you don’t agree your mental capacity is CLEARLY inferior. Erroneous. And congratulations operationrainfall! You are officially the TRUMP of the gaming world. For all your bizarre miscalculated, misinformed, erroneous use of definitions you unveil yourself as the tyrant you truly are.

  • Kyoji Foxfire

    My complaint isn’t with the clothing changes. It’s about the supposed removal of side story elements to erase the risk of death of a few particular side characters. THAT has me upset.