The Expression Amrilato Arrives on Steam

Friday, June 21st, 2019

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oprainfall | The Expression Amrilato

 

After originally being rejected by Valve, the all-ages yuri tale and visual novel developed by SukeraSparo, The Expression Amrilato, has arrived on Steam. It was rejected because Valve said it “sexualizes minors,” and Manga Gamer responded saying it has no sex scenes. They did succeed in getting that issue cleared up, and the title has now gone up for sale on Steam. You can get your copy with a nice 20% discount if you order it now. If you like learning, watching cute girls have fun, or enjoy touching stories that may well make you cry, then you might want to check it out.

In The Expression Amrilato, a girl named Rin is minding her own business just purchasing a snack in the shopping area of her hometown. Suddenly her world is turned upside down when things around her transform. The sky is now pink, and though she should know the area well, everything is different somehow. The signs are written in an unfamiliar language, and the people around Rin are speaking it too! So she can’t make any sense of what they’re saying! In Rin’s moment of need, a cute girl, Ruka, appears and tries to help her.

 

Rin is a very positive person, and Ruka is a supportive girl who speaks only a bit of Japanese. The story follows the new friends and their fumbling efforts to communicate. It turns out that in this new alternate reality, Juliamo is the official language. In real life this language is Esperanto, an international language created to facilitate communication between people of different countries. While enjoying the story, you can also learn this language. The text was supervised by the National Esperanto Association in Japan. The Steam page says you may also be able to learn some Japanese via the Japanese version that is included, and a Chinese version is planned.

There is a quiz-oriented study mode in The Expression Amrilato, which can also be played directly from the main menu, and a story narrative/prioritization mode. After finishing the game, you can also set whether you would like to have Esperanto translations shown as subtitles or not in case you want to keep learning the language. The Expression Amrilato is also available on MangaGamer.com and gog.com.

About Michael Fontanini

Michael is a veteran gamer in my early 30s, who grew up around video games, with fond memories of the oldies like the NES and SNES. He loves Nintendo but also plays a lot of games on his PC. Michael also enjoys going for walks or bike rides, and loves animals.

Michael is also a computer programmer. This started with a toy he got as a kid called PreComputer 1000 that was made by V-Tech. It had a simple programming mode which is what started him down the road of being a programmer! Michael can program in BASIC, Visual Basic, C++, C#, and is familiar with Java and Lua Script.

Putting programming and gaming together, Michael became a hobbyist game developer which may give him some good insights on game development! Most recently, he has been playing with the free version of the Unity engine (a powerful and easy-to-use game engine).

I love Nintendo but I also play a lot of game's on PC, many of which are on steam. My favorite Nintendo game's include Zelda, Metroid, and Smash Bros to name a few. On PC I love the Half-Life games, as well as most all of the Source Engine games just to name a few.